Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Education Department Issues Guidelines to Protect Students with ADHD



guest post by the CHADD Public Policy Committee


Today the Office of Civil Rights of the US Department of Education (OCR) issued guidance to every public school district in the country about the implementation of Section 504 for students with ADHD. CHADD provided significant input to OCR as OCR was developing this guidance. CHADD, through its public policy committee and its professional advisory board, had ongoing and active discussion with the OCR. We shared the concerns of our members about the implementation of Section 504 and the effects on their children. We provided scientific research and knowledge about ADHD as well as our recommendations for best practices for educating students with ADHD in school and ideas about how to improve the implementation of Section 504 to benefit students with ADHD.

A 2014 survey of CHADD’s membership reinforced our concerns that the Section 504 process in the schools was clearly not working. Parents reported major violations in every step—from referral, to evaluation, to development of a student’s Section 504 Plan, to its implementation and, unfortunately to the frequent suspension and expulsion that became the outcome. The lack of appropriate referral, evaluation, and eligibility practices was particularly problematic, as it suggested that there are likely many children with ADHD that may need Section 504 protection that were not being referred or found eligible for a 504 Plan. In addition, implementation of these plans was especially troubling, with two thirds of parents reporting the plan was not implemented in the classroom.

The statistics and anecdotal reports from parents were consistent with the concerns that parents and professionals involved with CHADD frequently report. The individual stories, albeit brief, were heart wrenching and provided a painful human dimension to the statistics. These students with ADHD were being denied a free and appropriate public education and an equal opportunity for participation in school. The safeguards of the Section 504 regulations were not providing adequate protection from the problems these children experienced.

CHADD urged stronger action from the US Department of Education to ensure that school staff would understand both their obligations under Section 504 and the symptoms of ADHD and best practices for responding to it. Equally important, we urged stronger guidance and enforcement from the OCR to ensure that appropriate safeguards and supports are put in place for all students with ADHD that are or should be eligible for the protections of Section 504.

In its press release announcing the issuance of this guidance, OCR reported that more than one out of every nine complaints alleging discrimination on the basis of disability in elementary and secondary schools that OCR received in the past five years involved students with ADHD. OCR stated the most common of these complaints concerned “academic and behavioral difficulties students with ADHD experience at school when they are not timely and properly evaluated for a disability, or when they do not receive necessary special education or related aids and services.” This verifies the seriousness of CHADD’s concerns about noncompliance with Section 504.
                                                                                                                                 
We applaud the Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education for their efforts to make sure that the civil rights of students with ADHD are protected in our public schools. We appreciate the guidance on implementation of Section 504 that they have developed for all school districts nationwide.

CHADD will continue to provide feedback to the OCR about the effectiveness of the new guidance. CHADD will continue to provide science-based research findings that address the educational needs of students with ADHD, and CHADD will continue to be a leader in providing high quality teacher training, so that ADHD students and teachers too, will be partners in education.

Ingrid Alpern, JD, LLM
Matthew Cohen, JD
Jeffrey Katz, PhD
CHADD Public Policy Committee

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Bringing Teacher to Teacher to Louisiana



We have a very important announcement to make, just ahead of CHADD's Annual International Conference on ADHD in New Orleans next month: CHADD, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, and the Louisiana Department of Education have formed a partnership to bring Teacher to Teacher training to the Louisiana public schools. You can read the press release about the partnership below or on the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals website.

If we can bring parents, teachers, and providers together to work with each other based on the evidence-based practices that CHADD contributes... well, just try to imagine how effective that would be. This may be the most exciting thing CHADD has ever attempted!

—Mike MacKay, CHADD President


DHH Partnership Created to Improve ADHD Assessment and Treatment

State agencies bring national Teacher to Teacher program to Louisiana public schools
Monday, October 26, 2015  |  Contact: Media & Communications: Phone: 225.342.1532, E-mail: dhhinfo@la.gov

Baton Rouge, La.
—Broadening its response to both the human and financial costs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) today announced a partnership with the Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE), and CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), the national resource on ADHD. The partnership will train more Louisiana teachers to recognize classroom behaviors caused by ADHD and to use appropriate and effective techniques to address them.

"By working with CHADD and LDOE, we will help more Louisiana teachers identify and accommodate the learning needs of children with ADHD in their classrooms. The better prepared our teachers are, the more students will have the opportunities to succeed," said DHH Secretary Kathy H. Kliebert. "This partnership will also help reduce the number of children without a genuine ADHD diagnosis from being misidentified based on classroom behavior. It's a win for everyone."

Louisiana has one of the highest rates of ADHD prescription drug use in the country. While ADHD is a neurological condition affecting children in all communities, the rate of ADHD prescriptions is especially high in boys, with 17 percent of all Louisiana boys enrolled in Medicaid taking ADHD medication. DHH formed the ADHD Task Force in August 2014 to research and promote best practices regarding the proper diagnosis, medication and treatment of ADHD. This new partnership is an expansion of the Task Force's efforts to help ensure that teachers throughout Louisiana have the best possible information and training when instructing children they suspect or know to have ADHD.

"We want to give our students every advantage to succeed in the classroom," said State Superintendent of Education John White. "We're excited about this partnership and this pilot program because it provides our educators with the tools necessary to support these students and give them every advantage possible."

Members of the ADHD Task Force, including the State's Department of Health and Hospitals in conjunction with the Department of Education met on Tuesday, September 29, with representatives of CHADD. This coalition of local and national resources discussed an approach to assist Louisiana's teachers in recognizing when classroom behaviors are caused by ADHD and appropriate techniques to effectively address them. An implementation plan is currently being crafted that will be centered on CHADD's 'Teacher to Teacher' Program.

"CHADD is absolutely delighted to work with the State of Louisiana in order to improve the lives of children affected by ADHD. This is a first of its kind initiative whereby students, parents, teachers and health care providers will all potentially be affected due to the unique ability of the Departments of Health and Education to collaborate in assessment and problem-solving. CHADD will ensure that the State has access to the best evidence-based practices available," said Mike MacKay, CHADD's President. 

Teacher to Teacher: Best Practice Intervention Strategies to Ensure School Success is a day-long workshop that helps educators identify common ADHD-related learning problems and proven classroom techniques, interventions, and the latest research to enhance school success for students with ADHD. This interactive training allows classroom teachers to discuss solutions to common academic and behavioral problems in a case-based format.

The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals strives to protect and promote health statewide and to ensure access to medical, preventive and rehabilitative services for all state citizens. To learn more about DHH, visit www.dhh.louisiana.gov. For up-to-date health information, news and emergency updates, follow DHH's Twitter account and Facebook.

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Tuesday, September 29, 2015

CHADD and Attention Point Partner to Improve ADHD Treatment Monitoring

guest blog by Sam English, PhD, and Michael MacKay, JD, MS, CPA

On September 28, 2015, CHADD announced a new benefit for parent members to help improve ADHD treatment monitoring.

“After a child is diagnosed with ADHD, and treatment initiated, it is important for parents, teachers, and clinicians to have regular ongoing communication” said Michael MacKay, president of CHADD. “Fortunately, there are new online tools available that facilitate this and we have partnered with Attention Point to make their online communication tool, DefiniPoint, available to our parent members for free.”

DefiniPoint is a HIPAA secure suite of online tools that improves communication enabling clinicians to easily gather feedback from parents and teachers about the efficacy of ADHD treatment. With this information clinicians are able to make a more informed decision on the child’s ADHD care.

“Regardless of the type of treatment involved, whether medication, behavioral therapy, or dietary treatment, it is essential the clinician know how well core ADHD symptoms are being managed and how the child is performing in important domains so adjustments can be made to optimize the child’s ADHD care,” stated David Rabiner, PhD, clinical psychologist, research professor, and associate dean at Duke University. “But unfortunately, recent research suggests that this may not always be the case. A study by Epstein et al. shows that rating scale data from parents and teachers, which help determine a child's treatment response, is rarely a part of follow-up medical visits. As a result, it is likely that many children are deriving less benefit from treatment than they would if treatment monitoring were occurring.” For this reason, ADHD treatment guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry highlight the necessity of sustained, systematic treatment monitoring.

In July 2015, CHADD and Attention Point formed a strategic partnership to increase awareness of the importance of treatment monitoring and to increase access to educational and ADHD management resources. “We’re glad to be working with such a wonderful organization and I applaud CHADD for recognizing the need for better communication,” stated Sam English, PhD, founder and CEO of Attention Point. “I believe DefiniPoint will benefit CHADD parents and families and ultimately result in better care for children with ADHD.”

Learn more about CHADD member benefits and join today.  Once you've joined, you'll receive information on how to access your free use of DefiniPoint.

If you're already a CHADD member, use the Attention Point Schedule a Call feature to speak with one of their team members.



Sam English, PhD, is the founder and CEO of Attention Point, LLC. Michael MacKay, JD, MS, CPA, is the president of CHADD.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Why Participate in ADHD Research?


guest blog by Meghan Miller, PhD


Adults and families affected by ADHD often ask this question. They may wonder if it’s really worth the effort or if their input will actually make a difference. It certainly does!

Participation in research is important and crucial for three primary reasons:

  • Participating in research offers a powerful way to make a difference in the lives of individuals affected by ADHD. It is the only way we can find new treatments and improve existing ones so they work more effectively.
  • Participating in research helps us understand how ADHD develops so that we can work toward new approaches to prevent the impairments often associated with ADHD.
  • Participating in research provides you an opportunity to tell researchers what issues are important to the people most impacted by ADHD — children, adults, and family members directly affected by the condition.

An even more common question is, “What does research participation involve?” The short answer is that it varies depending on the type of research being conducted. For example, a study testing the effectiveness of a new medication will have different requirements than a study focused on understanding academic skill in children with ADHD. It is important to ask questions about the goals of the research and methods involved to determine if the research study is a good fit for you or your family member. For example, you might ask:

  • “Will my child be given an IQ test?”
  • “Will I be placed inside an MRI scanner?”
  • “Will my family member be asked to take medicine?”

Many research studies will conduct a thorough diagnostic evaluation for ADHD, often including IQ testing and sometimes including neuropsychological and academic testing. Oftentimes these studies will provide you with verbal or written feedback based on these tests — if you ask for it. Most studies also provide you with monetary compensation for your time or a small gift for your child’s efforts.

Hopefully the question you’re asking now is, “How do I get involved in research?” Here are a few resources to help get you started:

  • Head to CHADD.org, where a list of research studies from all over the country has been compiled.
  • If you’re located near a college or university, contact their psychology or psychiatry departments and ask if they have any ongoing research studies focused on ADHD. Sometimes this information will be featured on departmental websites. For example, at my institution, the UC Davis MIND Institute, we list studies in need of participants on our website. Examples of our current research studies focused on ADHD include a project focused on infants with a family history of ADHD in order to better identify ADHD early in life, a study of medication to treat ADHD in teens, and a longitudinal brain imaging study of self-control in adolescents and young adults with ADHD.
  • Ask your doctor. Sometimes physicians who treat patients with ADHD know about local research studies and can point you in the right direction.

Here at the MIND Institute, we are excited to be embarking on a new project that will link people with ADHD with clinicians, researchers, advocates, support groups, and each other through an innovative, privacy-assured online platform called Platform for Engaging Everyone Responsibly, or PEER, a project of Genetic Alliance. Led by Julie Schweitzer, PhD, this will involve partnering with local and national ADHD support groups, including CHADD and the Parent Education Network. The hope is that families affected by ADHD will be able to learn from one another by using a computer from their own homes. And, by sharing their health information, they will help researchers who are determined to develop better treatments for people with ADHD.

Ultimately, participating in research involves collaboration among individuals and families affected by ADHD, and researchers who hope to better understand ADHD.


A version of this article appears in the August 2015 issue of Attention magazine. Join CHADD and receive every issue!





Meghan Miller, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow at the UC Davis MIND Institute and a member of the editorial advisory board of
Attention magazine. She is one of the recipients of the 2015 CHADD Young Scientist Research Award. Her submission was titled, “Infants at risk of ADHD: A longitudinal study.”

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Handcuffed in School

guest blog by Carol Lerner, MSCCC

Treating children with ADHD who have behavior issues requires a multidisciplinary approach. It is unacceptable for a third grader, or any child, to be handcuffed for behavioral issues.

It is well documented that management involves a team of professionals, including a psychologist, a behavior specialist, a psychiatrist, and/or a social worker. A police officer is not likely trained in the management of children who have ADHD.

I believe the child should be in the least restrictive environment to maintain safety for both the child who is acting out as well as the other children in the school setting. The appropriate professionals should be available and contacted immediately for intervention. Police officers working in a school setting with children who have special needs should be trained in the management of behavior issues and acceptable interventions, without the use of handcuffs or force.


Carol Lerner, MS, CCC, is a speech-language pathologist and a co-founder of CHADD.

Friday, August 7, 2015

Handcuffs and ADHD

guest blog by Ann Abramowitz, PhD

A nation views on TV an eight-year-old boy who is placed in handcuffs by a school resource officer. The child’s arms are behind his back, and he is yelling. Collectively, we experience horror watching this take place—in a classroom no less. We learn that the child has ADHD, and that another child, also with ADHD, has been treated similarly.

As a nation we seem to agree that this was not an appropriate form of discipline. In fact, my husband pointed out that if a dog were treated that way—tied to a chair with legs bound together—it would be a crime. What we are seeing here appears to be child abuse, which is a crime.

Without knowing the specifics of the case—for example, whether the children had IEPs, whether there were any type of behavior plans in place for these children and if so, whether the plans included assistance by the resource officer—I would have to speculate that what happened was an escalating chain of events that resulted in a impromptu call to the resource officer. But this may not be the case.

We know that youngsters with ADHD are more likely than youngsters without ADHD to exhibit the types of disruptive behavior that can lead to harsh discipline and abuse. We also know that youngsters with the combination of ADHD and disruptive behavior do best when they have a calm, structured environment that employs positive behavior supports; a confident teacher who administers discipline fairly and skillfully; and schoolwork that is appropriate to the child’s needs in terms of level of challenge, length and type of task. Rules and consequences should be spelled out, taught systematically and thoughtfully, and enforced calmly and consistently.

The school’s job is to create an environment in which disruptive behavior is less likely to occur, and in which it is handled well when it does occur. This isn’t easy, and it can only occur when all staff receive training and operate as a team. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) offers such a school-wide approach, and is well-established. Given such a backdrop, the incidence of disruption requiring any type of restraint will be greatly reduced.

Federal guidelines issued by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan state that restraint should only be used when there is risk of injury to someone, and that mechanical restraints should not be used. Restraint should be employed only as an emergency procedure, and never as a punishment. Each school district should have an established policy regarding restraint (and seclusion). There is absolutely no place for handcuffs, much less using them to bind a child’s arms behind his or her back.

And finally, let us consider this: Handcuffs connote criminal behavior. In this incident, school personnel saw fit to stigmatize these children as criminals. Without question this will impact their perception of themselves and others’ perception of them, perhaps for the rest of their lives.



Ann Abramowitz, PhD, a professor in the department of psychology at Emory University, is chair of the CHADD Professional Advisory Board.



Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Increasing Access to Resources for Better ADHD Management


guest blog by Sam English, PhD, and April Gower

On July 15, 2015, CHADD and Attention Point, LLC, announced a strategic partnership aimed at increasing access to effective ADHD resources to help monitor and manage ongoing ADHD treatment. Attention Point is a leading health IT company committed to improving the diagnosis and management of neurobehavioral health disorders. The company’s product, DefiniPoint, is a suite of online ADHD tools that improves ADHD management by connecting clinicians, professionals, patients, and parents.

Currently in the US there are at least 15 million people affected by ADHD who may benefit from better information and communication. Regular, ongoing communication between those involved in the care and treatment of children or adults with ADHD is a key factor in effective ADHD management. In addition to making educational and clinical resources more readily available, CHADD and Attention Point hope to increase understanding of the importance of ongoing monitoring and communication.

“This strategic alliance is a tremendous opportunity for CHADD and Attention Point to achieve mutual goals of increasing access to much-needed ADHD educational resources for individuals and families,” said Michael MacKay, President of CHADD. “Additionally, this information will benefit ADHD professionals who are on the front lines of treating this burdensome disorder.”

Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry recommend that information be routinely gathered from multiple individuals (e.g., home and school) to inform treatment decisions and to monitor progress.

“Carefully monitoring treatment over time is essential for promoting the healthy development of children with ADHD. Regardless of the type of treatment involved, whether medication, behavioral therapy, or dietary treatment, consistently obtaining feedback is important and can be enormously helpful to optimize a child’s ADHD treatment,” said David Rabiner, PhD, clinical psychologist, research professor, and associate dean at Duke University. “Unfortunately, as suggested by findings from a recent study,  this is infrequently done, and I am encouraged that CHADD and Attention Point will be working together to raise awareness of this important aspect of high quality ADHD treatment.”

“At Attention Point we believe that technology can help clinicians to more easily and accurately conduct ADHD assessments and provide better care for individuals diagnosed with ADHD,” said Sam English, PhD, Founder and CEO of Attention Point. He continued, “By working with CHADD, we believe together we can help the many children and adults that struggle with ADHD to lead better and more productive lives.”


Sam English, PhD, is the founder and CEO of Attention Point, LLC. April Gower is the COO of CHADD.